Learning About Africa

 

Africa

Africa

AFRICA is full of talented individuals. No matter where we are in the world, there is an African man or woman doing great things. This is what makes my job (if you call it really a job) so enjoyable all the time. As an editor for a magazine that focuses on showcasing Africans positive contribution to the world, it’s such a pleasure meeting and talking to these great individuals that I get the privilege to call “brothers” or “sisters.”
It’s not a racial thing, to be proud of where you come from. We live in a world where Africa and Africans are thought to be at the bottom of the development curve, considered by many the last human group to still get into the evolution bandwagon. Yet, when you look at the history behind the development of the Northern Hemisphere civilizations, you will find the contribution of someone coming from the mother land.

So, are we to blame the Western civilizations for our currently stereotyped identity? Or, are we really what people think we are? Obviously, in every stereotype, there is a little bit of facts involved. As I always say: [quote]A stereotype is truthful information that has passed through many interpreters, dissected into many pieces and then re-packaged to make sense to the current designated listener.[/quote]
But today I would like to remind everyone that Africa is not what you see on your local TV programming; it’s more than that. Africa is not what you hear from your local leaders, law makers, and entertainers; it’s just a message lost in translation.

The only way to learn the real truth about Africa is to go to Africa. This is truth to any other part of the world as well. Never take someone else story (including myself) as the true picture; you need to “see”, “feel”, “hear”, “taste”, “immerse” your own self into what you’re seeking.
That’s why I recommend you to expand your horizon; if you want to know about Africa, you need to go to Africa. If you can’t go to Africa, you need to hang out with people that are from Africa, keeping in mind that until you actually get to Africa, even Africans in the Diaspora will be translators to what you’re seeking (at least, better translators).

ADUNAGOW magazine was created to be that medium for you. We bring you news, interviews, stories, and much more from Africans in the Diaspora so that you can see there are more to Africa and Africans than what you see on your regular TV programs. Our ultimate goal is to create enough interest in your heart so that you can break away from the stereotype and seek more by ultimately visiting Africa by yourself and enjoy its hidden treasure found on its culture, its people and its landscape.
Thank you for your continuous support and patronage to ADUNAGOW Magazine. Now go ahead and enjoy this issue.
Thank you,

Eric Adunagow
Executive Editor